Wikia

StarCraft Wiki

StarCraft 64

Talk0
5,415pages on
this wiki
StarCraft 64
StarCraft64 SC1 Cover1
Developer

Blizzard Entertainment, Mass Media Inc

Publisher

Nintendo of America Inc.

Designer(s)

Mass Media David Todd (Executive Producer)
Nintendo
David C. Bridgham (Producer)
Blizzard
Michael Morhaime, Bill Roper (Executive Producers)

Released

NA June 13, 2000
EUR June 16, 2000

Genre

Real-time strategy

Modes

Single-player, multi-player (split-screen)

Platforms

Nintendo 64

Input

Game controller

StarCraft 64 is a "port" of the game of StarCraft to the Nintendo 64, released a year and a half after StarCraft: Brood War. As a console game, it had a different control scheme. StarCraft 64 contains both the original game and the expansion set, including the bonus mission Dark Origin. Playing the Brood War storyline required the Nintendo 64 4 MB Expansion Pack.[1]

StarCraft 64's storyline was slightly different. It had a different tutorial section.[2][3] In addition, StarCraft 64 had a secret bonus mission entitled Resurrection IV.[4]

InterfaceEdit

StarCraft 64 has several differences in interface from the PC version of StarCraft, such as command buttons that did not previously exist. For example, pressing one of the buttons on the controller brought up a menu with the two "build" buttons, a button for training units and a button for researching tech - selecting either "build" button from this would be equivalent to selecting the nearest worker unit (such as an SCV) not already building something, moving the screen to its former position, and clicking the appropriate "build" button. Selecting the tech button on the menu would perform a similar action, automatically selecting the nearest idle tech structure of a certain type to research something (one selected a researchable upgrade technology, such as terran Infantry Weapons or protoss Ground Armor, from the menu that appeared and the nearest appropriate structure would receive the order.)

Mike Morhaime holds a negative opinion of the game, describing it as "clearly a port," and not designed for the interface that the N64 provided. It was decided post-release that Blizzard would do no more console ports unless they thought the game was suited for consoles.[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. StarCraft Needs Some Expansion. IGN (1999-11-16). Retrieved on 2008-01-19
  2. StarCraft 64. Vivendi Games. Mission: Boot Camp (in English). 1998.
  3. StarCraft 64. Vivendi Games. Mission: Officer Training (in English). 1998.
  4. Blizzard Entertainment, Mass Media Inc. StarCraft 64. (Nintendo of America, Inc.) Mission: Resurrection IV (in English). 2000.
  5. 2014-10-03, THE THREE LIVES OF BLIZZARD ENTERTAINMENT. Polygon, accessed on 2014-10-04

Freeman. Game Credits for StarCraft 64. Mobygames. Accessed 2008-11-20.

Around Wikia's network

Random Wiki